Lentils

  1. When inspecting decorticated (i.e., seedcoat removed ) lentils, do the lentil standards apply or are they considered a “Not Standardized Commodity?”

    ANSWER.
    Decorticated lentils are a processed commodity and as a result, would be certified as Decorticated Lentils. Consequently, they may be inspected for quality factors (e.g., damaged kernels, skinned lentils, etc.), but not graded. Apply the same factor definitions and interpretations to decorticated lentils as are applied to unprocessed lentils.
     
  2. Are insect chewed lentils considered as damage or weevil damage?

    ANSWER.
    Damage. Care should be taken not to confuse with chipped/broken lentils.
     
  3. Are lentils with a dark discolored seedcoat (commonly referred to as rust colored lentils) considered damage?

    ANSWER.
    The condition which is created in storage (oxidation process) or as a result of high moisture lentils being exposed to the sun/heat and becoming “sunburned” is currently NOT considered damage. NOTE: Do not confuse with Ascochyta blight.
     
  4. If an applicant requests a determination of test weight, what procedure should be used?

    ANSWER.
    Test weight determinations should be made before the removal of dockage on a representative portion of sufficient size to overflow the kettle and certified to the nearest tenth of a pound.
     
  5. How would a lentil sample containing two dead insects grade?

    ANSWER.
    Distinctly Low Quality. Sample Grade.
     
  6. If you have a sample of lentils that contains obvious contrasting classes, can the sample be made Good color?

    ANSWER.
    Yes, provided the overall color of the predominating and contrasting lentils are of a good natural color.
     
  7. When using the Carter Dockage Tester to determine dockage in Thresher-Run Lentils, what does the material removed by air function as?

    ANSWER.
    Dockage.
     
  8. When processing Thresher-Run Lentils, the handbook states that the air should be set to 9. Is it permissible to run Thresher-Run Lentils with the air setting at 6?

    ANSWER.
    Yes, depending on the model being used. The particular model will dictate the position at which maximum airflow is achieved. For example, with the XT-1, the setting may very well approach
     
  9. For the XT-3, a setting of 6 offers maximum airflow. The important thing to remember is to use the setting that provides the greatest amount of air. Consult your local equipment specialist for guidance, if needed. 9. How do pods with lentils inside function in a thresher-run sample?

    ANSWER.
    Dockage.
     
  10. The chapter for Dockage-Free Lentils does not define the insects which function as weevils or other live insects injurious to stored lentils. Should the USDA-ARS, Agricultural Handbook 500, “Stored-Grain Insects,” serve as a reference in making this determination?

    ANSWER.
    Yes. If two or more live insects are found, consider the Lentils to be “U.S. Sample Grade.” One can also view images of insects on the GIPSA website.
     
  11. Rogue lentils currently only function as Inconspicuous Admixture when inspecting Dockage-Free Lentils. Since “rogue” lentils also meet the definition of Foreign Material should they also function as Foreign Material?

    ANSWER.
    No. Packers, exporters, and end users do not view seeds that closely mimic the appearance of lentils, such as Vicia sativa (commomly known as vetch, mimics, or rogue lentils), as being as detrimental to quality as dockage or foreign material. Hence, the U.S. lentil industry feels that such seeds should not be considered as foreign material, but as a separate factor.
     
  12. Are bag markings/ink stains considered damage in Lentils?

    ANSWER.
    Yes. Use VRI-Len 1.8 (lentil on the left) for guidance. Dirt and grime damaged lentils include lentils and pieces of lentils with dirt or grime (including nightshade juice) adhering to the seed coat equal to or greater than shown. Since nightshade juice is in the definition, this interpretation also pertains to lentils with bag markings/ink stains on the seed coat. The discoloration appearing on larger/smaller lentils should be proportional.
     
  13. Can sieves be used as an aid when determining contrasting classes in lentils?

    ANSWER.
    Yes. The mechanical separation must, however, be reviewed to determine whether any hand adjustment is needed to recover lentils that may have fallen through a sieve but do not meet the practical definition of contrasting lentils. Remember, “substantially different in size,” as mentioned in the standard, is defined visually, not by any particular sieve size.
     
  14. Individual factors/subfactors identified and considered in the assessment of “Defective Lentils” can only be scored once against the total and are scored in the following order: weevil-damaged, heat damaged, damaged, and split lentils. The handbook states that damaged contrasting lentils function as damaged lentils and contrasting lentils. Can a contrasting lentil also function as weevil damage, heat damage, split lentil or skinned lentil?

    ANSWER:
    Yes. But keep in mind the restriction placed on the scoring of “defective” lentils. Contrasting lentils can also function as skinned lentils (no restriction), but can only be scored once against damage, weevil damage, heat damage, or split lentils.
     
  15. In the Upper Midwest, lentils which have been handled through grain facilities are seeing an increase in very small broken pieces of lentils. It is very time consuming to hand separate the small pieces of lentils and lentil seed coats. Can substantially small pieces of lentils be sieved and function as foreign material instead of splits?

    ANSWER.
    No. Industry is reluctant to support any change in the broad definition of splits at this time. Consequently, until current definitions for splits and foreign material are modified, small pieces of lentils function as splits, and small pieces of seed coats function as foreign material.
     
  16. Is there any intention of making an Interpretive Line Print (ILP) for color for Crimson (red cotyledon) Lentils?

    ANSWER.
    No. Industry feels that a separate ILP for Crimson Lentils is not necessary. It is up to the inspector’s discretion and experience to use either the Pardina or the Regular lentil Interpretive Line Prints for color.
     
  17. Does color apply to bleached out lentils?

    ANSWER.
    Yes. After consultation with the Pea & Lentil Association, bleached out lentils do affect the marketing of lentils. It is up to the inspector’s discretion and experience to use either the Pardina or Regular lentil Interpretive Line Print (ILP) for color. When comparing the bleached lentil sample to the prints one should compare the amount of bleached out lentils to the amount of oxidized lentils, but the intensity only needs to contrast to the normal lentil color.
     
  18. The current ILPs for non-uniform lentils show the amount and intensity of discolored lentils needed in a sample to affect color. Can the intensity of the discolored lentils be lighter than shown?

    ANSWER.
    Yes. After consultation with the Pea & Lentils Association, they agreed that the amount of discolored lentils as shown is required but the intensity of the discolored lentils can be lighter if the lentils contrast with the remainder of the sample.

 

Publication Date: 
10/18