Organic Enforcement

USDA Seeks Nominations for the National Organic Standards Board

Release No.: 084-17

WASHINGTON, June 6, 2017 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is seeking nominations to fill an upcoming vacancy on the National Organic Standards Board (NOSB), a Federal advisory committee. Written nominations, with cover letter, resume, and an advisory committee background information form, must be postmarked or received on or before by Aug. 7, 2017.

Organic Integrity in the Supply Chain: Resource List for Organic Certifiers and Certified Handlers

The size and complexity of organic trade has grown over time, and many U.S. businesses rely on imports to create organic products that consumers want. As the market grows, many growers, processors, and handlers are working in multi-business supply chains, often across borders. Organic handlers and their certifiers play a vital role in ensuring the integrity of organic products from farm to market.

Organic Integrity in the Supply Chain: Overview for Certified Organic Handlers

The USDA Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) National Organic Program (NOP) protects the integrity of USDA organic products throughout the world. As the organic market grows, many growers, processors, and handlers are working within multi-business supply chains, often across borders. This short video reviews the responsibilities of organic handlers in verifying that organic imports comply with U.S. standards. The video also reviews the role of certifiers in overseeing imports and enforcing the standards.

USDA Publishes National Organic Standards Board Meeting Proposals and Discussion Documents

Today, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) posted meeting materials and an updated agenda for the National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) Spring meeting, to be held in Denver, CO, April 19-21, 2017. Documents are posted on the Spring 2017 NOSB meeting webpage.

International Trade with Mexico

Trade of organic products between the U.S. and Mexico is significant and growing. In 2015, U.S. exports of selected organic products to Mexico totaled more than $154 million, while U.S. organic imports from Mexico during that same time topped $141 million. Since Harmonized Tariff Schedule Codes do not track many organic products, the actual value of organic trade between the two countries is undoubtedly much higher.

Organic Standards

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